calcis

calcis
1.
calx, calcis, f. (m., Pers. 3, 105 dub.; Sil. 7, 696; cf. App. M. 7, p. 483 Oud.; Pers. 3, 105; Grat. Cyn. 278. Whether Lucil. ap. Charis, p. 72 P. belongs here or to 2. calx is undecided) [Sanscr. kar-, wound, kill; akin with lax, calcar, calceus], the heel.
I.
Lit.:

calces deteris,

you tread on my heels, Plaut. Merc. 5, 2, 111:

quod si ipsa animi vis In capite aut umeris aut imis calcibus esse Posset,

Lucr. 3, 792; 5, 136: incursare pug nis, calcibus, pux kai lax, Plaut. Poen. 4, 1, 3; Ter. Eun. 2, 2, 53:

certare pugnis, calcibus, unguibus,

Cic. Tusc. 5, 27, 77:

uti pugnis et calcibus,

id. Sull. 25, 71:

concisus pugnis et calcibus,

id. Verr. 2, 3, 23, § 56:

subsellium calce premere,

Auct. Her. 4, 55, 68:

ferire pugno vel calce,

Quint. 2, 8, 13:

quadrupedemque citum ferratā (al. ferrato) calce fatigat,

Verg. A. 11, 714:

nudā calce vexare ilia equi,

Stat. S. 5, 2, 115; Sil. 7, 697; 13, 169; 17, 541:

nudis calcibus anguem premere,

Juv. 1, 43.—Also of the heels of animals, Varr. R. R. 2, 5, 8; Col. 8, 2, 8:

quadrupes calcibus auras Verberat,

Verg. A. 10, 892.—Hence, caedere calcibus, to kick, laktizô, Plaut. Poen. 3, 3, 71:

calce petere aliquem,

to kick, Hor. S. 2, 1, 55:

ferire,

Ov. F. 3, 755:

extundere frontem,

Phaedr. 1, 21, 9:

calces remittere,

to kick, Nep. Eum. 5, 5; so,

reicere,

Dig. 9, 1, 5:

aut dic aut accipe calcem,

take a kick, Juv. 3, 295 al. —
2.
Prov.: adversus stimulum calces (sc. jactare, etc.) = laktizein pros kentron (Aesch Agam. 1624; Pind. Pyth. 2, 174;

W. T. Act. 9, 5),

to kick against the pricks, Ter. Phorm. 1, 2, 28 Don. and Ruhnk.; cf. Plaut. Truc. 4, 2, 55, and s. v. calcitro: calcem impingere alicui rei, to abandon any occupation:

Anglice,

to hang a thing on the nail, Petr. 46.—
B.
Meton. (pars pro toto), the foot, in gen.:

calcemque terit jam calce,

Verg. A. 5, 324 Serv. and Heyne. —
II.
Transf. to similar things.
A.
In architecture: calces scaporum, the foot of the pillars of a staircase; Fr. patin de l'échiffre, Vitr. 9, praef. § 8.—
B.
Calx mali, the foot of the mast, Vitr. 10, 3, 5.—
C.
In agriculture, the piece of wood cut off with a scion, Plin. 17, 21, 35, § 156.
2.
calx, calcis, f. (m., Varr. ap. Non. p. 199, 24, and Cato, R. R. 18, 7; Plaut. Poen. 4, 2, 86; dub. Cic. Tusc. 1, 8, 15; and id. Rep. Fragm. ap. Sen. Ep. 108 fin.; cf. Rudd. I. p. 37, n. 3; later collat. form calcis, is, f., Ven. Fort. Carm. 11, 11, 10) [chalix].
I.
Liv.
A.
A small stone used in gaming, a counter (less freq. than the dim. calculus, q. v.), Plaut. Poen. 4, 2, 86; Lucil. ap. Prisc. p. 687 P.; cf. Paul. ex Fest. p. 46 Müll.—
B.
Limestone, lime, whether slaked or not, Lucr. 6, 1067; Cic. Mil. 27, 74:

viva,

unslaked, quicklime, Vitr. 8, 7:

coquere,

to burn lime, Cato, R. R. 16; Vitr. 2, 5, 1: exstincta, slaked, id. l. l.:

macerata,

id. 7, 2; Plin. 36, 23, 55, § 177:

harenatus,

mixed with sand, mortar, Cato, R. R. 18, 7:

materies ex calce et harenā mixta,

Vitr. 7, 3.— Since the goal or limit in the race-ground was designated by lime (as later by chalk, v. creta), calx signifies,
II.
Trop., the goal, end, or limit in the race-course (anciently marked with lime or chalk; opp. carceres, the starting-point; mostly ante-Aug.;

esp. freq. in Cic.): supremae calcis spatium,

Lucr. 6, 92 Lachm.; Sen. Ep. 108, 32; Varr. ap. Non. p. 199, 24:

ad calcem pervenire,

Cic. Lael. 27, 101; so,

ad carceres a calce revocari,

i. e. to turn back from the end to the beginning, id. Sen. 23, 83:

nunc video calcem, ad quam (al. quem) cum sit decursum,

id. Tusc. 1, 8, 15: ab ipsā (al. ipso) calce revocati, id. Rep. Fragm. ap. Sen. l.l.; Quint. 8, 5, 30 dub.; v. Spald. N. cr.
b.
Prov., of speech:

extra calcem decurrere,

to digress from a theme, Amm. 21, 1, 14.—
B.
In gen., the end, conclusion of a page, book, or writing (mostly post-class.):

si tamen in clausulā et calce pronuntietur sententia,

Quint. 8, 5, 30:

in calce epistulae,

Hier. Ep. 9; 26 fin.; 84 init.: in calce libri, id. Vit. St. Hil. fin.

Lewis & Short Latin Dictionary, 1879. - Revised, Enlarged, and in Great Part Rewritten. . 2011.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • calcis — see OS CALCIS …   Medical dictionary

  • Calcis — Χαλκίδα Calcis …   Wikipedia Español

  • Calcis — En la mitología griega Calcis era una ninfa hija del dios fluvial Asopo y de Metope. Dio su nombre a una ciudad de Eubea. Según otra versión, fue la madre de los curetes y los coribantes, los primeros habitantes de esta isla. * * * (Chalkís) ► C …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Calcis — kulnas statusas T sritis gyvūnų anatomija, gyvūnų morfologija atitikmenys: lot. Calcis; Calx ryšiai: platesnis terminas – pagrindiniai terminai …   Veterinarinės anatomijos, histologijos ir embriologijos terminai

  • calcis —   L. calx, lime. Growing on limestone …   Etymological dictionary of grasses

  • Calcis (ninfa) — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda En la mitología griega Calcis era una ninfa hija del dios fluvial Asopo y de Metope. Dio su nombre a una ciudad de Eubea. Según otra versión, fue la madre de los curetes y los coribantes, los primeros habitantes de… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Euforión de Calcis — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Euforión de Calcis (Calcis de Eubea 275 a. C. Antioquía Siria 200 a. C.). Poeta griego del período helenístico. Vivíó en Antioquia donde fue bibliotecario de Antíoco el Grande. Su obra, casi toda… …   Wikipedia Español

  • os calcis — Véase calcáneo. Diccionario Mosby Medicina, Enfermería y Ciencias de la Salud, Ediciones Hancourt, S.A. 1999 …   Diccionario médico

  • Terra calcis — Tẹrra cạlcis   [lateinisch calx, calcis »(Kalk)stein«] die, , Bodenkunde: zusammenfassende Bezeichnung für Terra fusca und Terra rossa …   Universal-Lexikon

  • os calcis — os cal·cis kal səs n, pl ossa calcis CALCANEUS * * * calcaneus …   Medical dictionary

  • os calcis — ˈkalsə̇s noun (plural ossa calcis) Etymology: Latin, bone of the heel : calcaneus …   Useful english dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”